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26 July 2017
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Lithuania’s Hill of Crosses
without equal in the world

The Hill of Crosses (Lithuanian: Kryžių kalnas) is a site of pilgrimage about 12 km north of the city of Šiauliai, in northern Lithuania. The precise origin of the practice of leaving crosses on the hill is uncertain, but it is believed that the first crosses were placed on the former Jurgaičiai or Domantai hill fort after the 1831 Uprising. Over the centuries, not only crosses, but giant crucifixes, carvings of Lithuanian patriots, statues of the Virgin Mary and thousands of tiny effigies and rosaries have been brought here by Catholic pilgrims. The exact number of crosses is unknown, but estimates put it at about 100,000 in 2006.

 Number of crosses
1900    130
1902    155
1922    50
1938    Over 400
1961    Destroyed 5,000
1975    Destroyed 1,200
1990    Some 55,000
2006    Over 100,000

 

File:Colina de las Cruces, Lituania, 2012-08-09, DD 27.JPG

Over the centuries, the place has come to signify the peaceful endurance of Lithuanian Catholicism despite the threats it faced throughout history. After the 3rd partition of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1795, Lithuania became part of the Russian Empire. Poles and Lithuanians unsuccessfully rebelled against Russian authorities in 1831 and 1863. These two uprisings are connected with the beginnings of the hill: as families could not locate bodies of perished rebels, they started putting up symbolic crosses in place of a former hill fort.

When the old political structure of Eastern Europe fell apart in 1918, Lithuania once again declared its independence. Throughout this time, the Hill of Crosses was used as a place for Lithuanians to pray for peace, for their country, and for the loved ones they had lost during the Wars of Independence.

Most recently, the site took on a special significance during the years 1944–1990, when Lithuania was occupied by the Soviet Union. Continuing to travel to the Hill and leave their tributes, Lithuanians used it to demonstrate their allegiance to their original identity, religion and heritage. It was a venue of peaceful resistance, although the Soviets worked hard to remove new crosses, and bulldozed the site at least three times (including attempts in 1963 and 1973). There were even rumors that the authorities planned to build a dam on the nearby Kulvė River, a tributary to Mūša, so that the hill would end up under water.

On September 7, 1993, Pope John Paul II visited the Hill of Crosses, declaring it a place for hope, peace, love and sacrifice. In 2000 a Franciscan hermitage was opened nearby. The interior decoration draws links with La Verna, the mountain where St. Francis received his stigmata. The hill remains under nobody's jurisdiction; therefore people are free to build crosses as they see fit.

Category : Featured black / Travel Lithuania!

  • A beautiful, haunting place. How this hill with the crosses survived is one of the world's wonders. You drive there and all of a sudden you see the hill, the crosses, the rosaries, the offerings of the faithful to a place sacred to the Lithuanians. To be there is almost like being inside a church. No one talks loud. You hear the whispers of the faithful as well as the whisper of the wind making its way through the monuments. A chilling place when one thinks of the horrors this hill went through under the Soviets, but a proud place that it survived. I walked through the crosses, silently, thinking about my ancestors who lived in this country. I placed a cross there that I brought from home, just to have something there that I cold think about when I left. Pictures of it are nice to have, but the memory of having been there is nicer.

    January 08 2013
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